Young Hunters

Discussion in 'Hunting Lounge' started by Desert Rat, May 3, 2007.

  1. My daughter is 9 and really wants to "hunt" something. Are rabbits about the best choice for someone her age? What about a suitable gun? I bought her a .22 Magnum awhile back, but really it is still too long and heavy for her. I'm thinking now about a youth .410 ?

    I don't know if it's fair, but I told her I wasn't going to let her shoot at rabits unless she was willing to try eating them. Predators aside, I don't typically shoot stuff that I don't plan on eating - but that's just me...

    What has everyone had success with, when it comes to kids this age and size?

    Here she is "helping" me on my deer hunt last year
    [​IMG]

    Few years ago
    [​IMG]
     
  2. i like the youth 410 thats a good choice and another one is a youth .22 long rifle like the chimpunk they are really good for kids. as for eatting what you hunt thats what we do also i give you a thumbs up and get her in a hunter ed class when she is 10 years old tons of info for her :)
     

  3. I have a youth model Win .223, and a couple of .22's that my kids use. As for the eating it before you hunt it. I dont care either way, as there are folks in the family who will eat anything. The wife on the other hand is a staunch supporter of it. She will only hunt things she will eat (elk) and the kids seem to follow her lead. And of course all the kids have their own bows. Mostly stick bows, but #2 shoots a compound.

    Rabbits, Dove, Quail, are all good starters for that age. Just make sure to let her see dad miss a few first, and keep the encouragement up the entire time, even if none are hit. LOL.. Thats the challenging part.

    Good luck, and keep her out in the fields, She will end up being part of your most memeorable hunts.

    Shane
     
  4. Chief

    Chief Guest

    I think I would stay away from the 410 as a starter. A 410, in my opinon, is for the advanced shotgunner not a beginner. To many misses and she could get discouraged. All of my kids and grandkids have started either on the 28 or 20 gauge, not near the misses.

    She sure is a cutie.
     
  5. I have a 20 gauge single shot that might work for her. Kick's like a mule though but a recoil pad would probably help a bunch. I got it from a friend of mine years back for my son who was about 8 at the time.
    Let me know if you're interested...it's not in great shape, but would make a good starter shotgun for a young'un (with a recoil pad that is). Couldn't tell you what brand it is - somewhere out of Brazil if I recall correctly.
    It's just sitting in around gathering dust - be happy to make you a heck of a deal on it.
     
  6. Muley727

    Muley727 Guest

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    I agree with chief about the .410, and the shells cost about 3 times as much as 20 gauge. I just recently bought a winchester 1300 youth 20 gauge pump for my 8 year old son. maybe something like that might work for her?
     
  7. Chief

    Chief Guest

    Excellent choice, 20 ga for birds & small game, 22LR for plinking and a 243 for deer & javelina. She'll probably get her first javelina before dad does.
     
  8. AZ~ThunderDan

    AZ~ThunderDan Site Administrator Staff Member Super Mod Mod Premium Member

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    I agree that the .410 is more for advanced wing-shooters, but it can work extremely well for non-avian game such as rabbits and squirrel. First squirrel and rabbit that I shot as a kid was with a single-shot .410.

    Also, most of the eurasian dove that I encounter are usually perched on dead trees, utility poles or fence posts and rarely on the wing, so in that regard, it would work well for perch-swatting.

    I feel the .22 LR is the wiser choice. IMO, rifles such as the Chipmunk and Ruger 10/22 are both excellent choices for beginning youth hunters in quest of small-game. I think the first exposure to a .22 rifle should come from a single-shot, bolt-action .22. Graduating to a semi-auto should come after advanced shooting skills and safety consciousness traits are observed.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2007
  9. You know it, chief. Those things are my nemesis... lol